You can’t have agile without lean.

Amazon, the e-commerce giant, pushes new code live to their customers every 11.6 seconds. And they are using agile short cycles as a competitive advantage — releasing early and often, gaining market feedback, and iterating based on what they learn to create a continuous conversation with their customers.

Essentially, they are discovering their product at the same time they are delivering it.

Lean UX is based on collaboration, cross-functionality, and removes the isolation software engineers, product managers, and designers experience from one another.

The days of the waterfall process are finished. Work is ever ongoing. We can’t afford to wait on the work of other teams, nor can we keep waiting on work from others.

Instead, we need daily continuous engagement with all our colleagues if we are going to be truly successful. This annihilates the need for heavy deliverables where teams build shared understanding together.

Shared understanding allows our team to make decisions faster and empowers us to engage in more strategic conversations so we can focus on gathering insights that can affect strategic choices for our product.

This also allows us to change how we talk about design — features and documentation is replaced by talking about what works and allows us to measure what works, learn, and adjust.

Lean UX is a culture that allows us to work with humility, acknowledge our initial solutions will probably be wrong and use multiple sources of insight to continuously improve our thinking.

Gothelf, Jeff, and Josh Seiden. “Lean UX: Designing Great Products with Agile Teams.” Lean UX: Designing Great Products with Agile Teams, O’Reilly, 2016, pp. 3–5.

I grew up with art always being the main focus in my life. What I’m most interesting in cultivating is a deep connection between art and science.

I grew up with art always being the main focus in my life. What I’m most interesting in cultivating is a deep connection between art and science.